2009 ACURA MDX FOR SALE

Three-row, 7-passenger Crossover SUV in great shape (besides with major dent on trunk!)

“The MDX is a well-rounded, seven-seat SUV that consistently outscored vehicles costing thousands more. We liked its refined powertrain, quick acceleration, responsive handling, and controlled ride. We found the interior fit and finish impressive and the front- and second-row seats comfortable. But the third-row seat is tight for anyone but kids. The controls can be daunting at first, but are easy enough to operate once you become familiar with them.” — Consumer Reports

Consumer Reports Reliability: 4 / 5
Consumer Reports Owner Satisfaction: 4 / 5

Black with Beige Leather

90,200 miles, well maintained with regular synthetic oil changes and scheduled services

Second owner, purchased on 9/21/2013 (our mechanic inspected three other MDX’s and this was his top pick)

5-Speed Shiftable Automatic with 3.7L V6 300hp engine

Fuel Economy: 12.5 mpg in City, 16-18 on Freeway

Transferable warranty expiring at 100k miles or 9/21/2018

Kelley Blue Book: $12,700* (link)

Craigslist: $14,950-19,995** (link)

 Contact Chadd for more information: [email protected] or 206.335.0230

*Kelley Blue Book at fair condition without Entertainment package

** 2008 and 2009 MDX with over 80-110k miles, clean title (no leins, rebuilt, salvage)

Improvements and Recent Maintenance

  • Synthetic Oil Changes and all scheduled services since we’ve owned the car
  • New Bluetooth Module to allow audio streaming from phone in May 2017
  • B13 Scheduled Service in May 2017: Brake and Steering Fluid Flush, Tire Rotation, and Synthetic Oil Change
  • New Battery, Spark Plugs, Rear Differential Fluid, and Fuel System Cleaning on 9/24/2015 (10k miles ago)
  • New Bridgestone Alenza tires on 12/9/2013 (19k miles ago) and rotated every year

Known Issues

Major Dent in Rear Liftgate

I backed into a low railing at about 3-miles-per-hour. The major denting on the trunk lid is deep and noticeable, but not structural, and the automatic liftgate is functioning fine. However there are two issues:

Two collision shops have recommended replacing the entire rear liftgate (~$1,250 used), and both mentioned that it could easily be done in 3-5 hours by someone with minimal experience (a few bolts and changing out the lights/wipers, etc.).

The backup camera (~$200 used) needs complete replacement to function and just plugs in, however many used liftgates will come with the camera installed already.

A few friends have commented they wouldn’t care enough fix it, while others said they definitely would… so it’s a mixed bag depending on personal priorities!

Thus we have opted to not repair it and let the purchaser decide whether to repair or leave as is. 

Rear A/V Jacks are Broken

These are for plugging in a video game system or external audio. Replacement Part is $150 New (*YR240L* 39590-STX-A02ZC)

Warranty

The transferable warranty expires at 100k miles or 9/21/2018, and covers most major mechanical issues.


Detailed Vehicle History from VehicleHistory.com (similar to CarFax)

Below are the historical events for this vehicle listed in chronological order. Any discrepancies will be in bold text.

Report Run Date: September 06, 2017

Vehicle: 2HNYD28459H508784
DATE MILEAGE SOURCE DETAILS
2008 Original Manufacturer Fuel Economy Test 15 MPG Hwy / 20 MPG City
2008 Original Manufacturer Shipped to Dealer – Original MSRP: 46590
2008 Original Manufacturer Manufactured in Canada Alliston, Ontario, Canada
01-02-2009 7 mi. New York Historical Odometer Record
12-31-2009 NMVTIS No Problems Reported
12-31-2010 NMVTIS No Problems Reported
12-31-2011 NMVTIS No Problems Reported
12-31-2012 NMVTIS No Problems Reported
2013 50,000 mi. Acura BasicWarranty: Expired
2013 50,000 mi. Acura RoadsideAssistance: Expired
10-16-2013 69,610 mi. Washington Current Odometer Record
12-31-2013 NMVTIS No Problems Reported
2014 Unlimited mi. Acura CorrosionWarranty: Expired
12-31-2014 NMVTIS No Problems Reported
2015 70,000 mi. Acura PowertrainWarranty: Expired
12-31-2015 NMVTIS No Problems Reported
12-31-2016 NMVTIS No Problems Reported
09-06-2017 Theft Database Vehicle Status : No Stolen Records Available
09-06-2017 Edmunds – True Market Value Trade-In : $11,476
Private Sale : $12,685
Dealers Retail : $14,163

Odometer Records Source : NMVTIS

DATE STATE OF TITLE RECORD TYPE MILEAGE VIN
01-02-2009 New York Historical 7 mi. 2HNYD28459H508784
10-16-2013 Washington Current 69610 mi. 2HNYD28459H508784

Accident Records

Your Vehicle Checks Out: There have been No accident record(s) reported to VehicleHistory.com for this vehicle. The accident records on vehicle history are composed of a number of state sources and some independent agencies, they are based strictly on the information that is available to us.

No ACCIDENT FOUND ON RECORD

Previous Vehicle Uses And Incidents

Your Vehicle Checks Out : VehicleHistory’s database for this 2HNYD28459H508784 shows No negative titles or other problems. When reported to VehicleHistory, these events can indicate serious past damage or other significant problems.

VEHICLE USE NO ISSUES FOUND

Consumer Reports Reliability: 4 / 5
Consumer Owner Satisfaction: 4 / 5

The MDX is a well-rounded, seven-seat SUV that consistently outscored vehicles costing thousands more. We liked its refined powertrain, quick acceleration, responsive handling, and controlled ride. We found the interior fit and finish impressive and the front- and second-row seats comfortable. But the third-row seat is tight for anyone but kids. The controls can be daunting at first, but are easy enough to operate once you become familiar with them.

Driving Experience

The 300-hp, 3.7-liter V6 provides smooth and responsive performance. Expect 17 mpg in mixed driving on premium fuel.

The MDX easily towed our 3,500-pound test trailer to 60 mph in a quick 15.6 seconds. The five-speed automatic transmission is responsive and shifts very smoothly. It also has an easy-to-use manual shift feature.

The MDX handles very nicely. The body stays relatively flat in corners, steering is well weighted, communicates feedback and is responsive. Handling remains composed even over undulating mid-corner bumps. Overall, the Acura feels agile and confidence-inspiring.

The AWD system is transparent, making the Acura stable and secure on our track, with balanced behavior at its cornering limits. The AWD system, called SH (“Super Handling”) sends power to the rear wheels when power is applied in a corner and can favor one wheel over the other one to help cornering.

In our avoidance maneuver, the MDX posted a modest speed, but had some tail wag before the stability control kicked in.

Overall braking performance is very good. Stops in the wet and dry were short and well controlled. Stops on our wet/dry split-mu surface were short and straight. The brake pedal felt firm and responsive.

The MDX rides firmly, yet absorbs bumps with fairly good isolation and muted impacts. The body remains steady and controlled, thanks to well-restrained ride motions. The MDX is quiet, with moderate wind noise and a smooth engine hum. Road noise does intrude mildly, but is less pronounced than in the previous model.

The standard low beam HID (high-intensity discharge) bulbs illuminate a good distance straight ahead and to the sides with intensity. high beam halogens reach a very good distance and maintain the intensity from the low beams. A distinct sharp-edged cutoff line between light and darkness at the top of the low beam pattern can reduce visibility when traveling over dips and bumps. Minor amounts of stray light heading upward can illuminate snow or rain, reducing visibility.

Inside The Cabin

The nicely finished interior includes wood trim, textured plastics and high-quality switchgear.

The MDX has plenty of head- and legroom, even for tall drivers, but some found the wide center console tunnel rubbed their right leg. The dead-pedal footrest is well-designed. A power tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel helps drivers find an optimum position. Short drivers liked sitting high in the MDX with its low cowl height. All in all, a wide range of driver sizes fit nicely in the MDX.

Visibility is good to the front and sides with lots of glass area, but the A-pillars have wide bases. A tiny rear quarter window and wide D-pillars create a large blind zone to the rear side.

Our MDX had an optional rear-view camera. At start-up, the camera takes approximately 10 seconds to be usable because you’re forced to wait for the screen to display the Acura logo before the image appears. The back-up lights don’t illuminate much behind the vehicle, reducing the camera’s nighttime effectiveness.

Most drivers found the firm and well-padded front seats supportive and comfortable, even on a long trip. Large bolsters provide very good lateral support, but aren’t confining. Tall drivers had plenty of thigh support and seat travel range. The driver’s seat has a full range of power adjustments, including lumbar. However, the front passenger seat lacks adjustable lumbar support.

The rear bench seat has room for three six-footers sitting abreast. Leg- and headroom are very generous. The seat cushions are firm and supportive. The seatback reclines.

The third-row seat is cramped and difficult to get to. With the middle seat folded forward, passengers need to squeeze through a narrow opening.

Access to the front seats is easy, but there is a small step up. The doors are very large and the sills are nearly flush. Assist grips are above each door.

The controls in the center of the dash are a sea of tightly clustered, look-alike gray buttons. The steering wheel contains 10 switches as well. Until you become familiar with using them, it can be confounding. The navigation system adds a confusing multidirectional controller to the dashboard. And while destinations can also be entered by voice commands, we miss the old MDX’s touch-screen controls.

The dual-zone automatic climate system features additional automatic climate controls for the rear. Both front and rear seats are heated and come with two temperature settings, though several drivers complained the heaters didn’t get hot enough. You have to toggle through the trip computer to see ambient temperature, but you can’t see trip and temperature information at the same time.

The MDX has generous interior storage, with a variety of well-sized areas. These include a large locking glove compartment, a moderately-sized one in the center console and long front door pockets (as well as shorter rear door map pockets). The MDX also has a unique storage compartment in the base of the center console, accessed by a sliding door in the passenger-side foot well. Smaller storage areas include a small cubby on the console, a flip-down overhead sunglass holder, a seatback pocket on each front seat and a small armrest compartment for the third-row seats.

Front seat occupants have two large recessed and covered cup holders atop the front console. A recessed two-container cup holder pops out of the end of the folded second-row seatback armrest. Two more recessed cup holders serve the third row seat. Each door pocket has a molded bottle holder.

The front single-layer sunvisors slide on their mounting rods to allow side coverage adjustment. Each has a covered, lighted vanity mirror. The front two rows of seats have switched map lighting for each side, while the third row makes do with general overhead lighting.

The MDX has a 12-volt outlet on the center console. When the MDX is equipped with the optional Entertainment Package (as was our tested MDX), you get a 115V/100W AC outlet in the center console compartment. Three Homelink-compatible devices can be remotely controlled by switches on the headliner.

The Entertainment Package includes a rear seat DVD player with one center-mounted fold-down screen. The dashboard-mounted drive means parents can load and control the player. The wireless headphones and the remote control store neatly in a ceiling recess. Unfortunately, this option package deletes the simple in-console MP3 auxiliary input (the AC plug takes its place), but instead features an auxiliary audio/video input on the back side of the center console.

Safety

Front seatback-mounted side-impact airbags and curtain head-protection airbags, extending to protect the heads of outboard occupants in all three rows, are standard. The head-protection airbags are designed to deploy in either side impact or rollover events. The additional airbags supplement the required front airbags and three-point seatbelts at all seating positions. Front seatbelts have adjustable upper anchors for getting a more comfortable and safe fit and are equipped with pretensioners and force limiters to reduce belt slack and forces in a crash. Sensors for the front belts also influence front airbag deployment; if the belts are not in use, the front airbags may deploy in a less severe crash. The driver’s seat position will also influence front airbag deployment. Sensors in the front passenger seat detect the size and position of the front passenger; the front airbag will disable if the system determines the seat is unoccupied or if an infant or small child is seated there. If the system detects the front passenger leaning into the deployment path of the side airbag, it will also disable that airbag.

Adjustable and locking head restraints are at all seats. The front and second-row outboard restraints are tall enough, even when lowered, to reduce rearward head travel and limit whiplash injury. The center second- and third-row restraints must be raised to protect taller passengers. Daytime running lights are standard.

Driving with kids

There is not enough room behind the raised second-row seatbacks to install rear facing seats in the third row. It may also prove difficult to install rear facing seats in the second-row center, since they tilt easily. Rear facing seats should be secure in the outboard second row and front facing seats should also be secure in all passenger positions. There are three top-tether anchors on the second-row seatback and two on the rear cargo sill for the third row. There are also lower LATCH anchors in the second-row seats. Though all are recessed, the outboard versions are nestled against the firm seat bolster cushions making them more awkward to access than the center anchors.


Contact Chadd for more information: [email protected] or 206.335.0230